TWISTED LOVE. It’s coming.

 

TL COVERIs a guy with one arm handicapped? Archaeologist Julietta Angular doesn’t think so, if he can undo buttons, snaps and zippers.  She’s rich, spoiled, and makes an incredible discovery: in Mexico City, a hidden temple, with entwined lover’s bones, and a sinister pool that possesses an arcane power. Her excitement is cut short when told of her father’s murder.

Bent on revenge she vows to find her father’s killer.  Julietta learns the assassin is a murderous one-armed hit man who is also a cannibal. She tracks him down and extends a dinner invitation.

 

Border Pulp. What the hell is it?

DKARMA

Bad guys can be trend setters.

Just got this. The shirt that El Chapo is wearing is blowing out the door in boutiques in the U.S and Mexico. He’s a true fashion Badass.

Mr. Penn appears in the standard black T-shirt. I get mine from Walmart. They’ve recently gone up to seven or eight bucks.Screen Shot 2016-01-24 at 11.06.14 AM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where do writers get their stories?

In interviews people ask me, “Where do you get your story ideas?” All of my tales take place on or around the Mexican Border.  Sometimes the action takes place deep in Mexico. Its’s what fascinates me. So when something like Sean Penn’s interview with El Chapo, the Mexican Drug Lord makes the news it’s a no brainer. Because that’s the heart of a story.

DEL CASTILLO PENNJoaquin Guzman, known as El Chapo, wants to move Hollywood to Sinaloa and do a film based on his life. Sean Penn with the help of Kate del Castillo snuck into Mexico to meet the Drug Lord. Rumors imply Penn made elaborate plans to slip across the border in the trunk of a friend’s car. He was unaware his trip was being monitored by a suspicious DEA.

Penn and del Castillo are now being investigated by Mexican authorities. She is accused of brokering the meeting with the Drug Lord. El Chapo said he didn’t know who Sean Penn was.

Penn says he didn’t bring El Chapo down. He was miles away when that happened. But he probably looks over his shoulder a lot. Guzman was captured on January the eighth of this year. Penn and Guzman met in October of last year when Guzman was still a fugitive from Mexican justice. El Chapo was described as confident and dressed in a silk shirt and pressed black jeans. Well groomed and looking to be in good health, he was the most wanted man in Mexico.EL CHAPO

The Sinaloa Cartel is famous for creating elaborate tunnels for drug trafficking. Guzman’s escape passage from Altiplano Prison had a motorcycle on rails that was used to transport tools.

Guzman has been ranked as one of the richest men in the world. The cartel’s estimated income has been three billion dollars a year.

My name is Wally Runnels and I write Border Pulp.

 

 

 

So it’s a pitch. Sorry.

MOM NAT.11-03Got this in the mail a while ago. I love this stuff.

The only thing I can say about the Mexican/American border here in California is that it’s cold down there. It’s in the 30′s and 40′s. Too cold for me. And it’s been quiet, at least in East San Diego County. No big groups crossing like in Arizona and Texas. Locals who live in Jacumba tell me it’s mostly small parties and singles trying to cross.

Hope you enjoyed Christmas. Now here comes the new year. Hang on and have a good one.

My name’s Wally Runnels and I write Border Pulp.

SIXTY MILES AWAY.

 

According to the Pew Research Center immigration from Mexico was zero in 2010. Since then more Mexicans have left the United States. By 2014 the illegal Mexican population had decreased. Just don’t bother giving these facts to the people arriving in Altar who plan to cross the border into the U.S.

The latest border hopefuls are probably from Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, three of the most violent countries in Latin America. Now they’re in a little Sonoran town called Altar, sixty miles from the Mexican/American border.

AZ DESERTThis is what the ground looks like above Altar. The Arizona desert is rough and is always too hot or too cold. In Mexico or the U.S. travelers may be robbed and the women stand an eighty percent chance of being raped. With a pragmatic attitude contraceptives are sold at local pharmacies in Altar to prevent unwanted pregnancies.

Altar, Sonora is the popular staging place for immigrants wanting to cross into Arizona. The northbound travelers are a major factor in the economy of the little community. Merchants cater to their needs by selling camo outfits, bedrolls, soft sandals to blur footprints, canteens for water, neck scarves, hats, and boots to equip the hikers heading north across a dangerous desert. For some the local Catholic Church will provide food and shelter. ALTAR

Tension fills the streets. Altar can be a hotbed of violence. Two Sinaloa cartels, the Los Salazar and Los Memos clash for control over the little city of under eight thousand people. Men in dark glasses sit in cars and watch. Are they police or cartel? Could be either or both. A Catholic Priest sometimes walks the thoroughfares offering any help within his power to the newcomers.

Coyotes walk Altar’s streets at night looking for customers. Bodies are money and support their business. The smugglers work for the cartels or pay a kickback so they may continue their clandestine work. Three thousand five hundred dollars is the usual price to be driven to Phoenix without any guarantee of success. The money usually comes from families and friends north and south.

It’s a sad business where the paying customer is never right.

My name is Wally Runnels and I write Border Pulp.

 

 

SIXTY MILES AWAY.

The latest border hopefuls are probably from Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, three of the most violent countries in Latin America. Now they’re in a little Sonoran town called Altar, sixty miles from America.

According to the Pew Research Center immigration from Mexico was zero in 2010. Since then more Mexicans have left the United States and by 2014 the illegal Mexican population had decreased. Just don’t bother giving these facts to the people arriving in Altar who now plan to cross the border into the U.S.

DS_0015This is what the ground looks like above Altar. The Arizona desert is rough and generally  too hot or too cold. Either in Mexico or the U.S. travelers may be robbed and the women stand an eighty percent chance of being raped. Contraceptives are sold at local pharmacies in Altar to prevent unwanted pregnancies.

Altar, Sonora is a popular staging place for immigrants wanting to cross into Arizona. The northbound travelers are a major factor in the economy of the little community. Merchants cater to their needs by selling camo outfits, soft sandals to blur footprints, canteens for water, neck scarves, hats, and boots to equip the hikers heading north across a dangerous desert. For some the local Catholic Church will provide temporary food and shelter.

Tension fills the streets. Altar can be a hotbed of violence. Two Sinaloa cartels, the Los Salazar and Los Memos clash for control over the little city of under eight thousand people. Men in dark glasses sit in cars and watch. Are they police or cartel? Could be either or both. A Catholic Priest sometimes walks the thoroughfares offering any help within his power to the newcomers.

Coyotes walk Altar’s streets at night looking for customers. Bodies are money and support their business. The smugglers work for the cartels or pay a kickback so they may continue their clandestine work. Three thousand five hundred dollars is the usual price to be driven to Phoenix without any guarantee of success. The money usually comes from families and friends north and south.

It’s a sad business where the paying customer is never right.

My name is Wally Runnels and I write Border Pulp.

 

 

BORDER PULP NEWS: The Border has changed.

It was late fifties when my family moved into the Boulevard area. Since then the Border has changed a great deal. Hiking on the Border used to be pretty carefree. You’d see people heading north but they avoided you as you avoided them and no one said anything. You didn’t always call the Border Patrol.

Then you could crash through the brush laughing and talking in a noisy camaraderie. The only worry was about snakes.

SMUGGLINGA while back I was out and happened to be alone looking for Indian campsites; it’s something of a hobby.  Not being in a crowd, caution became a key factor.  Loud sound made me uncomfortable.  Breaking branches and the rattle of rolling rocks meant I moved around brush and stayed on the sandy soil as much as possible.

Earlier I had spoke with a Border Patrol Officer and he said I should have no problems.  If there were any sightings of illegal activity stay hidden and if they see you keep out of their way.  Don’t try any citizen’s arrest, as there are legal and physical dangers.  And if you see a group carrying weapons, keep out of the way.

The high desert is a wild and beautiful country.  If you decide to go out there carry plenty of water and carry a snake bite kit.

 My name is Wally Runnels and I write Border Pulp.

 

 

BORDER PULP NEWS: We’re surrounded by the Mexican Border.

 

I write fiction about the Mexican Border.

The Border is simple. You put up a wall that keeps Mexican people out.  But what about the Latin spirit that manages to cross over and blend and settle into the general society?

One day in Los Angeles I was waiting at Union Station for a train that was bringing my nephew from Orange County.  A little early, I walked out of the terminal to get some air.  Olvera Street was just a block away.  It’s the oldest part of Los Angeles.  A street that was laid out by the original Spanish settlers.

OLVERA STREETFollowing a flavorful aroma I walked over to a crowd that stood around a mobile grilling station.  A street post indicated that I was on Olvera Street.  In front of where I stood was the Cathedral, a local landmark.

A sign on the barbeque station said support your local Kiwanis Chapter, written in English and Spanish. Tacos, one dollar, come and get ‘em. Working the grill was some Mexican fellows and some  Angelo guys.  All were laughing and talking and  surrounded by customers of similar demographics. Thin sliced beef, fresh made tortillas and homemade hot sauce: heaven. I had two.

Here in California, the Mexican spirit is everywhere.  It’s in the architecture, markets, and restaurants and fast food chains: El Pollo Loco, Taco Bell, and Del Taco and these are just a few.

Go down a supermarket aisle and you’ll find tortillas, tortilla chips, salsas, refried beans, Mexican rice, cheeses, hominy for posole, a variety of hot sauces, enchilada sauces, Mexican seasonings, chilies and cilantro.

For the thirsty there’s Tecate Beer, Dos Equis, Corona and a variety of tequilas. We pass by these items without any alarm. We have adopted them. People, who moved north, legally and illegally, have shared their culture.

This is just another example of a Mexican saying, “We didn’t cross the Border the Border crossed us.”

My name is Wally Runnels and I write Border Pulp.

 

BORDER PULP NEWS: Does the Mexican/American Border need a rebozo?

 

FRIDA'S REBOZOMaybe the Mexican/American Border should be wrapped in a rebozo?  But that would just bury the border problem without solving it.

There’s got to be an answer. Local people who live on both sides of the Border need to sit down and resolve what the Border is.  Right now it’s a port of illegal entry, north and south.

Mexican and American sides could get together and figure out how to solve their problems.  National governments are usually too far away to render adequate resolutions on community matters.  Neighboring north and south districts could come up with reasonable solutions that both sides could live with.  Perhaps the border would become less dangerous and arbitrary.

It could be a community matter solved by ordinary people where the common solution is supported by the Mexican and American governments.

Until then tread carefully.

My name is Wally Runnels and I write Border Pulp. 

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Border Pulp, that’s what I call the stuff I write. Think of it as noir
in Spanglish, and in color. My protagonists and villains inhabit California/Baja border towns...




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